Show Your Expertise Through Content Marketing.

Twittering your way towards showing thought leadership

If you think of Twitter as a frivolous waste of pixels, you’re not alone. But Twitter is fast-emerging as a way to share informative content, helping your firm reach out to others and demonstrate thought leadership.

If you think of Twitter as a frivolous waste of pixels, you’re not alone. But Twitter is fast-emerging as a way to share informative content, helping your firm reach out to others and demonstrate thought leadership.

It’s particularly useful in niche areas -- perhaps commuter rail transport -- in which people who need up-to-date information may have trouble finding it. In this podcast, Donna Papacosta of Trafalgar Communications says that she also started out as a Twitter skeptic, but has since found it a valid way to discover people with useful information to share, learn from them and in many cases, build connections. In the podcast, she gives pointers such as:

  • Some social platforms, such as Twitter, can be challenging to master -- so be sure to educate yourself before you start building a following
  • Be sure that the author's bio, on the Twitter home page, is descriptive and accurate in what it says about your firm's areas of expertise
  • Most of what your firm tweets -- about 70% -- should focus on passing along content it's picked up from other Twitter users
  • Engage others, don’t just push out your firm's ideas

Donna Papacosta’s ten tips for making the most of Twitter

1To start, determine how you can complement your marketing and communication efforts with Twitter. Sign up at http://www.Twitter.com.

2When you write your 160-character Twitter bio, be sure to add relevant and interesting information to help people decide if they should follow you. Add your photo plus a link to your website or blog.

3Write about 10 tweets before you start following others. Twitter notifies you by email when someone follows you, and people usually check out the follower's profile before deciding whether to follow back.

4To find people to follow; start with your own address book. Use the "Find People" tab on the Twitter website. Be sure to follow thought leaders in your industry, and follow the people they follow.

5Share some Twitter love by retweeting others' content. Your Twitter feed should not be all about you.

6Engage with others by using the @ reply feature or direct messages (DM).

7Think about using a Twitter client such as TweetDeck or Hootsuite instead of the Twitter website. It will make Twitter easier to manage.

8Create Twitter lists of clients, prospective clients, colleagues and other people. This makes Twitter much easier to manage. The full Twitter "firehose" is usually too much to consume. (By the way, you can see someone's tweets in a Twitter list even if you are not following them. This is handy if you want to track your competitors on Twitter.)

9Learn how to use hashtags and search for them. I like to define a hashtag as "the deliberate use of a keyword." So, if I write a post about podcasting in general, I might not use the tag. But if I tweet about #podcasting, I'm letting people know that this tweet is ABOUT podcasting.

10Once you are comfortable with Twitter, try using Buffer to schedule tweets. Although I am wary of over-automation, I do like to schedule tweets to appear throughout the day, not just in the early morning when I'm scouring Twitter for great content.

Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Tagged under: Thought Leadership,

Add comment


Security code


Refresh